Gus (Ireland)
Gus (Ireland)

Photographed on Fen Road, Milton, Cambridge.

Andrea Grieve, Germany
Andrea Grieve, Germany

"The way immigration is reported in the media worries me. I sometimes think ‘oh maybe I don’t have a place here, maybe I should go somewhere else.’ When they bring in this legislation, for example limiting your rights to benefits, I think it puts up a barrier, and makes me think ‘oh, I thought I lived here too and contributed,' but not everyone sees it like that."

Photographed at Cambridge '99 Rowing Club.

Angelo Tardungo, Italy
Angelo Tardungo, Italy

Photographed in the Haymakers, Cambridge.

"It’s sad that most of the referendum debate has focused on economic arguments. I wish more time had been spent discussing the human aspects of immigration, such as how meeting people who’ve had a different upbringing makes life richer and more interesting."

Martina Kovalikova, Slovakia
Martina Kovalikova, Slovakia

Photographed in Harpur's Cafe, Cambridge

“For me the EU is a very good thing; I can work where I want. The UK minimum wage is much more than I can earn in Slovakia.”

Ewelina & Ana, Poland
Ewelina & Ana, Poland

Photographed outside their home, Cambridge.

Eloise Varin, France
Eloise Varin, France

"I’m a strong believer that, if one decides to live in a different country, then every effort should be made to assimilate. I have my doubts about multiculturalism: in the long term I don’t think that communities that self segregate and live a parallel life to wider society are a good thing."

Photographed in her studio, Cambridge.

Richard Nickl, Austria
Richard Nickl, Austria
Rogier Rutten, The Netherlands
Rogier Rutten, The Netherlands

Photographed by the River Cam, Cambridge.

Isabel Rosa, Portugal
Isabel Rosa, Portugal

"I think the debate about immigration is really about two issues: immigration and resources. I think if you contribute to society then you have the right to be there. But what I don’t agree with is people not contributing to society, who just move to get something out of it."

"Immigration without limits cannot be good for anyone, in my view."

Photographed by Trinity Street Market, Cambridge.

Adina Feldman, Sweden
Adina Feldman, Sweden

Photographed at Churchill College, Cambridge.

“The EU breaks down barriers between people and promotes tolerance and understanding… but I am afraid that this being taken for granted. The EU is often described as a union between governments, but it is equally a union between, and for, the people of Europe.”

Ryte (Latvia) and Harolds (Lithuania)
Ryte (Latvia) and Harolds (Lithuania)

Photographed at the Green Dragon, Cambridge.

“In our countries the situation is reversed. People are going away, not coming in, so the government is trying hard to get people to stay. In England you are gaining people, which is also a problem in a way, but a different one.”

Enikö, Hungary
Enikö, Hungary

"When the vote for Brexit came through, I felt a bit insulted. But people were so welcoming when I first arrived in Britain."

Sofia, Bulgaria
Sofia, Bulgaria
Miha Kosmac, Slovenia
Miha Kosmac, Slovenia
From Pro Photo magazine, issue 121
From Pro Photo magazine, issue 121
From Pro Photo magazine, issue 121
From Pro Photo magazine, issue 121
Gus (Ireland)
Andrea Grieve, Germany
Angelo Tardungo, Italy
Martina Kovalikova, Slovakia
Ewelina & Ana, Poland
Eloise Varin, France
Richard Nickl, Austria
Rogier Rutten, The Netherlands
Isabel Rosa, Portugal
Adina Feldman, Sweden
Ryte (Latvia) and Harolds (Lithuania)
Enikö, Hungary
Sofia, Bulgaria
Miha Kosmac, Slovenia
From Pro Photo magazine, issue 121
From Pro Photo magazine, issue 121
Gus (Ireland)

Photographed on Fen Road, Milton, Cambridge.

Andrea Grieve, Germany

"The way immigration is reported in the media worries me. I sometimes think ‘oh maybe I don’t have a place here, maybe I should go somewhere else.’ When they bring in this legislation, for example limiting your rights to benefits, I think it puts up a barrier, and makes me think ‘oh, I thought I lived here too and contributed,' but not everyone sees it like that."

Photographed at Cambridge '99 Rowing Club.

Angelo Tardungo, Italy

Photographed in the Haymakers, Cambridge.

"It’s sad that most of the referendum debate has focused on economic arguments. I wish more time had been spent discussing the human aspects of immigration, such as how meeting people who’ve had a different upbringing makes life richer and more interesting."

Martina Kovalikova, Slovakia

Photographed in Harpur's Cafe, Cambridge

“For me the EU is a very good thing; I can work where I want. The UK minimum wage is much more than I can earn in Slovakia.”

Ewelina & Ana, Poland

Photographed outside their home, Cambridge.

Eloise Varin, France

"I’m a strong believer that, if one decides to live in a different country, then every effort should be made to assimilate. I have my doubts about multiculturalism: in the long term I don’t think that communities that self segregate and live a parallel life to wider society are a good thing."

Photographed in her studio, Cambridge.

Richard Nickl, Austria
Rogier Rutten, The Netherlands

Photographed by the River Cam, Cambridge.

Isabel Rosa, Portugal

"I think the debate about immigration is really about two issues: immigration and resources. I think if you contribute to society then you have the right to be there. But what I don’t agree with is people not contributing to society, who just move to get something out of it."

"Immigration without limits cannot be good for anyone, in my view."

Photographed by Trinity Street Market, Cambridge.

Adina Feldman, Sweden

Photographed at Churchill College, Cambridge.

“The EU breaks down barriers between people and promotes tolerance and understanding… but I am afraid that this being taken for granted. The EU is often described as a union between governments, but it is equally a union between, and for, the people of Europe.”

Ryte (Latvia) and Harolds (Lithuania)

Photographed at the Green Dragon, Cambridge.

“In our countries the situation is reversed. People are going away, not coming in, so the government is trying hard to get people to stay. In England you are gaining people, which is also a problem in a way, but a different one.”

Enikö, Hungary

"When the vote for Brexit came through, I felt a bit insulted. But people were so welcoming when I first arrived in Britain."

Sofia, Bulgaria
Miha Kosmac, Slovenia
From Pro Photo magazine, issue 121
From Pro Photo magazine, issue 121
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